Posts Tagged ‘Tom Douglas Restaurants’

Mar05

A non-fiction fable of my first time fig affair

As I think about our last Prune-a-thon event, which is happening this Saturday and will focus on pruning fig trees, I can’t help but reminisce about my first time harvesting figs last summer. The reason I remember it so well is because it was also my first time ever eating a fresh fig.

I was picking figs in Capitol Hill on a private residence. It was July 13th-which I was told at the time was WAAAAY earlier than when figs normally ripen in these parts. I had almost zero concept of how largefigs or abundant a normal fig tree is but this tree felt large. I’d say the tree was about 50 feet tall. Anyway, it was DOWNPOURING that day and my rain jacket was soaked through in about 2 minutes. The thing about fig leaves is that they are super strong and can hold a lot of water on them so in addition to the rain falling, every time I bumped a leaf, it would essentially drop a water balloons’ amount of water on my head. As I’ve learned now, this is not an ideal time to pick figs as the skin can be sensitive, so the first one I picked, I ripped off much of the outer skin and because I was going to sell these, I figured this was a great reason to try my first ever fresh fig. I ate the full thing (a majority of people just open up the fig and eat the insides but I didn’t know better) and my taste buds danced for joy. I could not believe how delicious figs were! I ate a couple more right away and then tried to restrain myself as I was going to sell them to the Tom Douglas Restaurants, but I couldn’t help myself! Whenever I “accidentally” tore off a bit too much skin and they didn’t look beautiful, I decided the right thing to do would be to not let it go to waste and I’d just eat it whole on the spot. I ate at least 12 figs or so and was SOOOO very full. I was returned to my seven year old self with that mixed feeling of discomfort and pure pleasure one gets from eating half a bowl of cookie dough while waiting for the oven to heat (ok, I still do that.) It was great!

I then delivered almost 5 crates full (about 250 figs) to the Tom Douglas restaurant Serious Pie and Biscuit. I was very nervous as this was my first sale and I didn’t know how acceptable these would be to such a prestigious restaurant. I brought them in and passively asked the lead chef if what I had brought in was ok. To my great surprise, she was ecstatic! She called the cooks over to take a look and people even started taking selfies with the apparently gigantic figs that I had just brought in. I felt like a million bucks leaving that day and couldn’t wait for my next time picking figs! (Let the record show that I gained some self-control after that first overindulgence, but picking figs is still one of the highlights of my harvesting days.)

 

Jun18

Top Ten Reasons You Should Vote for City Fruit to Win $50,000!

There’s less than a week left to vote for City Fruit in Zipcar’s Communities with Drive program! We hope you’ve taken the time to help us win $50,000 and expand our urban harvest.  If you need a little more convincing, we have compiled a list of reasons to vote for us:

10.  Figs! You may not know it, but figs are a fruit grown throughout Seattle. Our annual gathering of figs helps sustain the harvest, as the fruit is too delicate for most food banks and we are able to sell them to partners like Tom Douglas Restaurants.

Fig

9. Apple cider. Each fall, we celebrate the apple harvest with a series of apple cider events in Seattle neighborhoods.  We also loan out our apple presses – one manual, one electric – to community organizations.  Tasty, delicious fresh apple cider? Yes, please!

8. Partners for a more sustainable future. We have a diverse range of partners that believe in the work we are doing and who help fund the harvest and our programming, including the City of Seattle Department of Parks and Recreation, the Washington Department of Natural Resources, and the King Conservation District.

7. Network of tree owners. With hundreds of residencies from around the Seattle area donating their trees to City Fruit, we help build communal solidarity through the idea that everyone deserves access to fresh, healthy produce. Neighbors get to participate in the sharing economy and build a stronger sense of community.

6. 55,000 pounds of fruit.  Over the last five years, City Fruit has harvested over 55,000 pounds of fruit from Seattle neighborhoods. This year the harvest is taking place in five neighborhoods – Wallingford, Ballard, South Seattle, West Seattle, and Phinney-Greenwood. We hope to continue expanding to new areas with your support, harvesting more fruit and getting it to those in need.

5. Stewardship. We conserve and protect Seattle’s natural resources by encouraging organic tree care, reducing the amount of pesticides entering our streams and oceans, and providing a healthy environment for our precious pollinators. Many of our orchard sites were once overrun with blackberry vines and other invasives before stewards intervened. We’re working to preserve urban orchards for the next generation.

4. Dedicated and knowledgeable Orchard Stewards. We train and support a network of hardworking volunteers who are committed to caring for Seattle’s diverse urban orchards. This amazing group works year-round to care for fruit trees and share knowledge with the public.

3. Delivering fresh fruit to 50 programs and growing. During the harvest season, City Fruit donates fruit to local food banks, meal programs, senior centers, and daycares, among others.  We’ve reached over 50 programs in the last five years.

2. Amazing volunteers.  From orchard stewards, to local volunteers, to corporate partners, to our amazing and talented board of directors, our work would not be possible without community support from people like you.

1. Rescuing a local resource. We take wasted, unused fruit and make it available to the emergency food system. Food banks often struggle to provide fresh produce for their patrons, and fresh fruit is especially appreciated and valuable. We also find uses for fruit that isn’t fresh eating quality, such as fresh cider, hard cider, preserves, and dried fruit.