Posts Tagged ‘fruit trees’

May29

Wealthy: Heirloom Apple

by Don Ricks, lead orchard steward at Piper’s Orchard, Amy Yee Tennis Center Orchard, and Good Shepherd Center orchard

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Probably the most historic orchard in Seattle is Piper’s Orchard in Carkeek Park. Some apple and pear trees there were planted over 120 years ago. www.pipersorchard.org

These trees were planted by Andrew W. Piper after he left his bakery business in the Great Seattle Fire of 1889 and retired to “the country” to work on his orchard and other projects.

The most common variety of fruit that he planted that survives today is called the Wealthy apple. This apple was common 100 years ago but is not common today. It is a variety that was primarily used for pie apples at the time, but even today it is highly prized as an apple for making hard apple cider.

The Wealthy apple was discovered by Peter Gideon of Excelsior, Minnesota in the late 1800s. At the time, Mr. Gideon invested literally his last dollar to try to come up with an apple that could withstand the cold Minnesota winters. We can be glad today that he discovered such a healthy apple because not only are the trees exceptionally long-lived, but they have been amazingly prolific year after year in Piper’s Orchard.

The Wealthy apple is just one of many heirloom apples still going strong here in the Pacific Northwest.

Click here for a map of the fruit trees at Piper’s Orchard:

For more information about Piper’s Orchard, see the City Fruit website describing stewarded orchards.

Photo credit: Seattle Tree Fruit Society Bob’s 100

 

 

We’d love to get you engaged in the City Fruit family! Check out upcoming events, become an ambassador to manage the fruit trees in your neighborhood and get your community involved, sign up to volunteer, or become a member to support City Fruit monthly or annually.

May04

Teens for Trees

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A student shares her ideas with the group!

On a sunny day in Wallingford, Meridian Park is buzzing with frisbees, dogs, and people enjoying the gardens and open spaces. It’s easy to miss that many of the trees supplying the shade are edible fruit trees! On Wednesdays, a group of students from the Boys and Girls Club of Wallingford wander over to learn about what it means to be a steward and how to preserve and protect the trees in their neighborhood. A community grant has made it possible for City Fruit to teach our first youth program focused on tree stewardship – our goal is to inspire hands-on learning that will enable students to become the empowered environmental decision makers of tomorrow. This small group of motivated students has started to learn about the importance of the urban canopy and the role trees play in the local ecosystem. On Earth Day, they made observations and held an open discussion about the ways trees influence our climate and protect our planet. As a group, the students identified the many tree-based products in our daily lives and how native peoples have used raw tree products for food, medicine, tools, clothing and more! Students are developing their stewardship, leadership and advocacy skills to bring back to their community and local trees. Various other local student groups have also volunteered with City Fruit to plant trees, clear weeds, and help assess the impact of fruit trees on public lands in Seattle.

Climate change has increased the urgency for environmental action on a global scale. It is increasingly important for the human species to preserve the shrinking global forests in order to continue to survive. Our youth are the conservation leaders of the future. Studies have shown, environmental education engages students in learning, raising test scores, and encouraging youth to pursue careers in environmental and natural resources.

This class was made possible by the Alliance for Community Trees and CSX.

 

We’d love to get you engaged in the City Fruit family! Check out upcoming events, become anambassador to manage the fruit trees in your neighborhood and get your community involved, sign up to volunteer, or become a member to support City Fruit monthly or annually.

Feb13

Favorite Fruit of the Presidents – Thomas Jefferson

We begin our President’s Day series of blogs by City Fruit staff members with a focus on Thomas Jefferson and his favorite fruit.

Heath Cling Peach

Heath Cling Peach

My husband is a long-time admirer of Thomas Jefferson so we have had plenty of conversations about our third president and his personally designed Virginia home, Monticello. When investigating the Monticello orchards, I first focused only on Jefferson’s favorite apples, the Esopus Spitzenburg and Newtown Pippin. Thought maybe I’d plant those varieties of apples in honor of the man and his orchard … haven’t yet.

But this week I dug deeper into Mr. Jefferson’s fruit fancies and smiled when I learned that he and I share the same favorite fruit: the lovely, delicate, versatile, scrumptious, elusive but not impossible to grow in our climate peach.

Peaches, native to China, were introduced to North America in the 16th century by Spanish or French settlers. At Jefferson’s South Orchard at Monticello he planted over 1,000 fruit trees, including 38 new peach cultivars. By 1811 the orchard had 160 peach trees, by far the most of any fruit growing there. Peach cultivars that Jefferson planted in the Monticello orchard included American originals such as Heath Cling, Oldmixon Cling and Free, Morris’ Red Rareripe, and Indian Blood Cling.

Indian Blood Cling Peach

Indian Blood Cling Peach

Jefferson’s abundant peaches were made into a cider-like beverage called mobby, which was often distilled into brandy. Or they were juiced and mixed with tea, or peeled and pickled, or sprinkled with sugar and dried in the sun.

Not surprisingly, Thomas Jefferson also created the first American recipe for ice cream, and had it served often at his homes throughout his lifetime.

So for President’s Day, enjoy a very President Jeffersonian fruit dessert: Mr. Jefferson’s Ice Cream Sundae with Brandied Peaches and Praline Crumbles.

Even Thomas Jefferson had trouble getting some fruit cultivars to grow at Monticello. If you want to be successful growing fruit in the Seattle climate, check out the “Best Fruits for Western Washington Yards” Quick Reference Guide on the City Fruit website, under Resources.

Barb Burrill is the Director of Orchard Stewardship at City Fruit

Jan26

Grateful for a day of service and a ton of hard work!

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Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. once said, “Life’s most persistent and urgent question is: what are you doing for others?”

It was one week ago today that we hosted a large event for Martin Luther King Jr Day. We are so excited to share the success of our MLK day of service–it was one of our most successful volunteer work parties yet! As our City Fruit team planned the special work project for MLK Day this year, we kept in mind our main goal of expanding the amount of work that we can do, caring for as many fruit trees as we can, and ultimately bringing the fruit back to our community during the harvest season.

We were buzzing with excitement at the opportunity to host two active community groups, the UW Husky Leadership Initiative and Projectline Inc. Each of these groups has created positive change within their organization and their enthusiasm was easy to recognize!

As volunteers came rolling into the orchard, we divided into groups, grabbed some tools, and conquered a couple of big projects. The Amy Yee Tennis Center Orchard has over 30 fruit trees with significant history to the South Seattle area. With over 75 volunteers with a combined 269 volunteer hours logged, our groups enthusiastically got to work clearing thorny blackberries, scotch broom, and other invasive weeds out from the base of the fruit trees. We were especially impressed with the efforts of our young stewards of the day who picked up fallen apples and planted young fruit trees in the newly cleared space!

The Amy Yee Tennis Center is now looking better than ever and we are excited for the prospects of this orchard for the 2015 harvest season. Thank you to everyone who came out and helped make this event a success for City Fruit. This was truly an inspiring group of volunteers and we are excited for the continued success of our future work parties!

 

 

Dec08

A Summary of a Successful 2014

Meridian

2014 was a record breaking year for City Fruit. In total we harvested over 27,948 pounds of fruit and donated 22,056 pounds to Seattle’s emergency food system. Thanks to 53 work parties and over 1,357 volunteer hours, 5,892 pounds came from 12 public orchards which City Fruit stewards. City Fruit also hosted 25 residential harvests; building a community of 80 volunteers around the stewardship and caring for both the fruit trees and our neighbors in Seattle. Along with our record breaking harvests and time committed to tree care, City Fruit developed a City Fruit Ambassador Program in which 13 members of our community trained to become year-round supporters of City Fruit in ways that align with their skills and passions. Through this training and lessons learned throughout 2014, we are building our capacity in hopes to make 2015 as successful of year this one turned out to be!

I’ll be celebrating our 2014 achievements through the end of the year on Twitter. Check out our City Fruit account here and my tweets signed with LJ.

Luke Jesperson is the harvest coordinator at City Fruit.

Dec02

#GivingTuesday: Why We Partner with City Fruit

GTWe love City Fruit! We each seek to give back to the Seattle community by making our members better gardeners and stewards of their edibles. Each year, City People’s Garden Store and City Fruit cohost the “Second Sunday & Some Saturdays Series” of workshops, which we offer free to the public. City Fruit finds instructors passionate about fruit trees and gardening in general, and the Garden Store hosts. The workshops range from Growing Figs to Protecting Pollinators, and this year we had our first Cider Making Event, which we hope to make an annual occurrence!

Each winter, as we receive our first bare root fruit in early February, City Fruit helps us brush off the frost and start the gardening season with enthusiasm, offering information on how to successfully grow bare root fruit and directing potential gardeners to our store. In return, we give a portion of our sales of winter fruit trees and bare root shrubs to City Fruit. Always a willing partner, the folks at City Fruit are wonderful to work with, and we admire all that they do. Please consider a donation to City Fruit today in the spirit of #GivingTuesday!

And be sure to check out the 2015 lineup of workshops (exact dates to be determined).

Kyra Butzel is with City People’s Garden Store in Seattle.

Dec02

#GivingTuesday: Why City Fruit Inspires My Work

FB IconI first noticed apple blossoms peeking out from blackberry vines along the Burke-Gilman Trail in 2008. I’ve been rehabilitating public fruit trees ever since. I started volunteering with City Fruit around that time, and about a year ago became the organization’s orchard steward coordinator. Now I support volunteer stewards and their fruit tree care efforts in public orchards all over the city.

Our tree care regimen is strictly organic, without sprays or chemical fertilizers. The care takes just a few hours per tree each season, but we need many helping hands. City Fruit staff members are trained to harness the energy of hundreds of volunteers, coordinate care with Seattle Parks gardeners, and harvest and deliver fruit into Seattle’s emergency food system.

In 2014, our stewarded orchards yielded 6,000 pounds of fresh, organic fruit suitable for donation. We hope to grow, harvest, and donate even more orchard fruit in 2015, but we need your help! We work in the orchards year-round and welcome as many volunteers as we can handle. Come on your own or with a group from work, school, or the neighborhood. Check the City Fruit calendar for 2015 work parties or email [email protected] to schedule a custom work party. And please, on this #GivingTuesday, donate what you can to help City Fruit continue to grow!

Barb Burrill is City Fruit’s orchard stewards coordinator.

Dec02

#GivingTuesday: Why I Founded City Fruit

GTUntil May 2014 I was the founding director of City Fruit. But that is not the reason City Fruit is at the top of my list when it comes time to donate. This is why:

A few years ago I spoke about City Fruit to a group of English-as-a Second-Language students, all of them immigrants. None of them understood why City Fruit existed. No one came from a place—not Europe, not Asia, not South America or Africa—where fruit growing in the neighborhood was allowed to fall and rot. “How could this happen?” they asked.

I didn’t know what to say. It was embarrassing. While a society with hungry people has a problem, a society that lets food go to waste in the face of that hunger has an even bigger problem. City Fruit works on many fronts to address this conundrum. It picks unused fruit and donates it to people who are hungry–28,000 pounds in 2014 alone. It teaches people about the value of their fruit and how to care for their trees. It reminds policymakers that urban fruit – and fruit trees – are a community resource. And it cares for fruit trees in our public spaces.

My donation to City Fruit pays dividends that I can see, feel, taste and smell: boxes and boxes of fresh produce delivered to food banks, shelters, daycares and senior centers. Clean sidewalks. Healthy trees. Civic pride. Please join me in making a clear difference in a simple way: Become a member of City Fruit by donating $50 (or more!) today.

Gail Savina is the founder of City Fruit and currently serves as a senior advisor to the organization. 

Nov23

Out in the Orchard: A Good Time to Plant a Tree

It’s November. You’ve harvested the fruit from your trees, BGT March 22 work party 2cleaned up fallen fruit, raked up diseased leaves, and spread mulch up to the dripline. What to do now? Plant a tree!

November is the best month to plant trees in our climate. Plant a tree in the spring, and unless you are really disciplined about watering, the dry summer months will stress your tree when it is trying to get established. Plant in November, and the rains take care of watering duties. Plus with our mild fall and winter, roots of the trees can even continue growing once they are planted, whenever the soil temperature is above 50 degrees.

A problem with this plan, though, is that most nurseries are not selling fruit trees in November.

City Fruit has a few fruit trees and edible perennials that are ready to plant now. Sign up using the online form. A small donation per plant is requested.

Some small local nurseries such asCal watering quince Burnt Ridge Nursery in Onalaska and Hartman’s Nursery in Puyallup may have fruit trees you can buy for planting now. Burnt Ridge sells trees at The Farmers Market of Olympia, open Saturday and Sunday from 10 to 3 through December. Contact small nurseries to confirm their fruit tree inventory before you take a road trip.

To get the most fruit production from your trees, buy two or more trees that can pollinize each other.

Location is crucial. The more sun the better – full sun is best. Leave enough room for the tree so it can grow to its ultimate mature size. You don’t want to be moving that tree again in a few years.

Once you are ready to get your trees in the ground, refer to City Fruit’s on-line resource document on How to Plant a Fruit Tree.

Good luck! Send us a photo of your new trees at [email protected]

Barb Burrill is City Fruit’s orchard steward coordinator. 

Nov20

Getting Started with Mason Bees

mason-bee-house-1In just two hours of your time each year, you can significantly increase the amount of fruit your trees produce. And you’ll have fun doing it. Just add gentle-natured mason bees for amazing pollination. This native bee out-pollinates her honey bee cousin by about 100:1, due to her messy pollen gathering techniques. She is a friendly garden companion that doesn’t mind people observing her activities. While there no honey produced, you’ll get healthy spring fruit and nut yields.

Mason bees are alive in spring when your fruit trees are in bloom. After the females have gathered pollen and laid their eggs for 4-6 weeks, they expire early June. While they’re alive, they use holes in your yard to nest and lay cocoons. These are your bees for next season!

In fall you “harvest” the cocoons from the holes where they nested earlier. The bee larva have grown into bees encased in cocoons and will safely overwinter in your refrigerator. This allows you to be in control of when you want to pollinate your yard. Do you need your cherry tree pollinated? Pull some bees out of hibernation in late March. Pollinate your apple tree? You’re removing them in April. It’s easy!

For the holidays, Crown Bees is offering a ten percent discount on Bee Starter Kits to City Fruit members! Email [email protected] for the discount code.

This guest post is made possible by Crown Bees, a local business dedicated to keeping food on the table and in our stores with mason bee pollination. Bees pollinate 1/3 of our food supply, which relies primarily on the troubled honey bee. The company promotes raising mason bees and educating backyard gardeners and farmers nationwide about this gentle-natured, efficient pollinator. It’s an easy way we can all help protect our food supply, one garden at a time.

 

Oct28

Wrapping Up the Harvest Season with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Puget Sound

Two weekends ago, we closed out our largest harvest season to date with a Harvest Celebration and Cider Press event at Amy Yee Tennis Center with City Councilmembers Sally Clark and Tom Rasmussen, City Fruit staff and board, and over 30 hardworking volunteers — many from Big Brothers Big Sisters of Puget Sound. To top off the event, we unveiled a new sign at Amy Yee that describes the orchard and its history and provides a map with all of the fruit trees. The sign was made possible by funding from the Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR).

In case you haven’t heard via our newsletter or social media outlets, this year we harvested over 28,000 pounds of fruit that would have otherwise fallen to the ground to rot. Since 1 in 5 children in the greater Seattle area go to bed hungry every night, we must not waste free and available resources. City Fruit’s work is helping to solve a piece of the food insecurity problem so many in our community face every day.

With 35 fruit trees, Amy Yee Tennis Center is one of many historic orchards found in Seattle’s ever-expanding urban landscape. Public spaces like the orchard at Amy Yee are tended by hundreds of volunteers throughout the year (not just during harvest season), and this final event was a celebration of our volunteer friends old and new. We were so fortunate to welcome Big Brothers Big Sisters on this day, and to be able to offer an opportunity for the youth from the organization to explore their natural environment by harvesting apples to eat and press into fresh cider. It was an experience many of them had not had before and will not soon forget.

Below are some great snapshots of our final large harvest event. If you or someone you know is involved at a local organization that would like to partner with City Fruit at the many public spaces we steward, please e-mail our Community Outreach Coordinator at [email protected]

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Hazel starts the Amy Yee event

Amy Yee Sign Unveiling

 

 Melanie Peters is the AmeriCorps VISTA Community Outreach Coordinator with City Fruit. She can be reached at [email protected]
Oct14

City Fruit Receives Funding from Wallingford Community Council

The Wallingford Community Council has awarded City Fruit a grant of $5,000 to help support the care and maintenance of fruit trees located at Meridian Playground and along the Burke-Gilman Trail. This funding is made possible by the neighborhood’s participation in the Waste Management Think Green Recycling Challenge.

Specifically, City Fruit will use the funding to engage in a large-scale effort to prevent pests from destroying fruit on the trees in Meridian Playground and the Good Shepherd Center orchard. This is the first year City Fruit has stewarded the park, harvesting over 2,000 pounds of fruit for donation to food banks and cleaning up another 7,000 pounds of fallen fruit.

Additionally, City Fruit will use the Wallingford Community Council grant to increase the number of natural pollinators in the neighborhood through the introduction of mason bees and native plants. Pollinators are essential to the production of fruit.

City Fruit thanks Jim Fryett, President of the the Wallingford Community Council for his leadership, Lee Raeen for coordinating the grant process, and the full Council for their support of the organization’s mission and these important projects.

 

Sep02

Giving Fruit to Youth in our Communities

High Point HEalthy Families Celebration

These past couple of weeks have been very exciting for me as I’ve been able to expose City Fruit to two neighborhood Back to School events and provide fruit to them as well! A large part of why I do the work I do is because I care deeply about culturally appropriate, healthy food access for all people regardless of where they live, what they do, or how much money they make. As a person who grew up in a working class family and who had to trek nearly thirty minutes to a single farmers market outside of my community, I’ve made it a part of my life’s goal to increase accessibility of affordable (or in City Fruit’s case, free!) fresh food.

The first event — High Point Healthy Families Celebration —  was held at Neighborhood House in West Seattle, one of the first neighborhoods in Seattle where City Fruit still harvests and donates fruit. The community event was hustling and bustling with other awesome organizations who have a presence in West Seattle. Besides for awesome City Fruit gear giveaways, we were able to donate many crates of Italian plums to complement their free dinner!

Van Asselt Elementary School was the next Back to School festival we were able to partner with this year. We’re lucky enough to work in the same neighborhood of the school (Beacon Hill), so providing fresh fruit for them just made sense! Over 400 people attended the event and they were able to enjoy some tasty varieties of pears and plums. They also got some sweet bookmarks to start their school year off right! Our harvest coordinator Luke dropped off the bounty and was swarmed by a group of third graders who asked asked him how much money all of the fruit cost to buy in which he was able to explain City Fruit’s model. His response was shocking to the kids: “It was free! Thanks to the goodwill and generosity of folks in our community, MANY more people can enjoy fresh fruit!”

Support City Fruit today by getting involved as a volunteer harvester to get more fruit to families in need. You can also join us by taking care of the fruit trees in one of the public parks we steward to ensure pest free apples, plums, and pears!

Melanie is the Community Outreach Coordinator for City Fruit.

Aug21

Meet City Fruit Ambassador, Phil!

Phil fruitselfie                 Philfruitselfie2

Meet Phil. Phil is just one of 13 City Fruit Ambassadors. The Ambassador program is simple: as an Ambassador you’re the voice and face of City Fruit in the neighborhood of your choice by committing 3-5 hours of volunteer work every month for a year. There are general themes and objectives during certain months, but you get to choose your activities based on your skills and passions. As an Ambassador you receive awesome City Fruit gear, support and guidance from our Community Outreach Coordinator, and a cool community of like-minded folks in your neighborhood to meet and collaborate with on projects!

But let’s get back to Phil. Phil is one of our Ballard Ambassadors. In the words of Phil, “Really, it boils down to the people for me.” Before Phil was a City Fruit Ambassador, he led volunteer fruit tree harvests with Solid Ground — an incredible organization that used to harvest fruit trees in Seattle’s northern neighborhoods. Leading neighborhood harvests in Ballard is the reason why Phil decided to become an Ambassador.

As an Ambassador, Phil enjoys getting to know people  be it fruit tree donors or the people who receive the donated fruit. When Phil harvests a tree he likes to get to know the tree donor — why did they choose to donate their tree, what’s their experience with fruit trees, the history of their tree, etc.

However, what affects Phil most is the actual delivery of the fruit: “When you get to experience the appreciation for something that I think we all take for granted [access to fresh food] it changes the way you look at your own circumstances. It really makes me feel very fortunate, and energizes me to take steps to help others.”

To learn more about how to get involved with City Fruit, sign up to volunteer at one of our regularly scheduled harvests here. And don’t forget to view our calendar for other opportunities, too!

Aug14

New to Fruit Trees – Summer Pruning

Pruning copyThis past weekend, I attended City Fruit’s second Sunday series at City People’s Garden Store on summer pruning with Bill Wanless.  The class was packed – over 30 attendees! Clearly, this is a topic of interest.

While my plum tree is too young for summer pruning, here are some tips and tricks to help promote growth and fruit production.

August is the best time for summer pruning. We prune fruit trees in the summer to improve the health of the tree, protect against pests and fungal disease, and produce more fruit or flowers. To make room for more sun and air, consider these cuts during summer pruning:

  • Cutting back new shoots that crowd the larger, more established branches,
  • Removing dead and broken branches,
  • Removing all suckers — branches that are growing from the base of the tree

Don’t prune too much – no more than a quarter of the total leaf surface in any one year. And don’t try to fix a tree in one year; if the tree needs a lot of work, do it over several years. For more guidance, check out this City Fruit video with Ciscoe Morris and Kristen Ramer Liang or this resource sheet.

Catherine Morrison is executive director of City Fruit and new to fruit trees. She planted her first tree, a Hollywood plum, earlier this year.  

Jun26

The cherries are coming!

photo (1)In my opening New to Fruit Trees blog, I said I was disappointed not to find a single fruit tree in my yard after moving to Seattle from Washington, DC. Not so fast. Let’s call this my second #fruitfail.  Not one, or two, but five — I have five cherry trees in my yard.  Seattle is truly an urban orchard. (To be fair, at the time, no cherries were growing!)

For help identifying our trees, I was able to call on one of City Fruit’s many experts. Laila Suidan, a trained arborist, taught me about each type of tree (and plant) in our yard and provided instruction on care and maintenance. Among other things, she taught me that many fruit trees, including cherry trees, have identifying lenticels on their bark.

City Fruit will soon launch a set of residential services, including connection to experts that can help identify and assess your fruit trees and assist in tree care and management. If you’re interested, please email [email protected] and we’ll send you more information. 

I’m looking forward to our first harvest of cherries this week! If you aren’t lucky enough to have cherry trees in your backyard, make sure to sign up for Collins Orchards CSA. Deliveries started June 25th, but you can sign-up at anytime.  The first few weeks of the CSA will include Early Robin Rainier cherries.


 

City Fruit members receive a 10% discount on the CSA! Join City Fruit Today — members may request the discount code by email.


 

Catherine Morrison is the executive director of City Fruit.  Follow her blog series and send your New to Fruit Tree questions to [email protected]

 

 

Apr10

Celebrate Spring; Two great classes this weekend!

The weather outside is perfect for getting back into your garden, and perfect for pollinators to make their rounds in the fruit trees. If you’re looking for something to do this weekend, check out these classes:


pollinators

Attract & Provide Safe Haven for Beneficial Pollinators, with journeyman-level certified beekeeper, Bob Redmond
SATURDAY 10am-Noon @ Bradner Gardens Park, 1730 Bradner Place South

If you’re interested in Native Pollinators, Don’t miss this class! Native pollinators comprise 99.96% of the pollinator species on the planet, and their existence is constantly under threat. Learn about these amazing species, their extreme importance to the future and security of food, and how you can benefit pollinators in your garden.

We’ll cover:
• Why pollination is vital for successful fruit crops
• History of pollinators
• How native bees differ from the standard honey bee
• How to identify native bees
• Attracting native bees—including what to plant
• How to create nesting habitats

City Fruit members – $20; general public – $25


containers

Success with Container-Grown Fruit Trees with Jacqueline Cramer, co-founder of Beacon Food Forest

SUNDAY 11am-Noon @ City People’s Garden Store, 2939 East Madison Street

Growing fruit trees in containers allows you to save space, move the tree around, reduce disease and, in many cases, produce more fruit. Join us to find out how you can successfully grow fruit in a small space!

We’ll cover:
• Appropriate trees for containers
• Soil types
• Understanding rootstocks
• Best Pruning techniques
• Special considerations for container trees

This class is part of the Second Sunday Series of fruit tree classes, a collaboration between City People’s Garden Store and City Fruit.

Call City People’s at 206-324-0737 to register – space is FREE, but an RSVP is required/appreciated. We hope to see you there!

Jan30

Support City People’s to support City Fruit

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City People’s Garden Store in Madison Valley is a locally owned and operated community garden store. Since opening in 1988, we have been committed to offering a wide selection of quality plants and organic and natural products to help you grow them. With over 15,000 square feet, the outdoor nursery is an urban oasis!

City People’s strives to give back to our communities who have so generously supported us over the years. Through donations and marketing avenues we support organizations that help us grow healthy communities in the areas of environment and gardening, education and youth programs, and food security.

This winter the Garden Store is concentrating support toward City Fruit through the sale of bare root fruit shrubs and trees.* 10% of the proceeds from the sale of these items through March will go to City Fruit. We will also host City Fruit workshops this month and throughout the year (details below, and on the calendar).

Bare root berries are coming from Peaceful Valley Farm, an organic farm in California; raspberries, blueberries, strawberries, goji berries, and currants, plus rhubarb, jerusalem artichoke, & asparagus. We are excited about this new organic vendor who use no sprays (including biological sprays), making sure not to harm any critters – especially fragile bees and butterflies.

Bare root trees from Mt Vernon, Washington and Mallala, Oregon include:
Apples – dwarf, columnar, espaliered & 4-way combo varieties
Pears – espaliered & 4-way combos
Cherries – including several dwarf varieties
Hardy Nectarine – dwarf
<& Plums, Figs, Meyer Lemons, Honeyberry, Kiwi, Japanese Pepper, Goumi, Grape and Hops!

City People’s Garden Store’s bare root fruit selection will be arriving the first week of February. Come early for the best selection!

* Buying bare root plants is an affordable way to grow your edible garden as you are buying only the plant and not the soil or the pot.


Don’t forget to check out City People’s Garden Store’s fruit-related talks coming this spring:
Registration is required. To sign up for a workshop, send an email to [email protected] or call the store (206) 324-0737.

Winter Fruit Tree Pruning
Sunday, February 9th, 11 am – noon
Winter fruit tree pruning can improve overall health and appearance and can increase fruit production. This class, co-sponsored by City Fruit, discusses pruning tools, basic biology behind pruning fruit trees, basic cuts and how to stimulate fruit production.

Planting Fruit Trees
Sunday, February 16th, 11 am – noon
Getting your fruit tree off to a healthy start means buying a healthy tree and planting it correctly. Root health is critical for tree health, and this class demonstrates the key considerations in planting a new tree. Bare root trees will be available and a portion of purchases of fruit will go to CityFruit. Instructor Jana Dilley is the Program Manager for the City of Seattle’s reLeaf program and is a certified arborist.

Pollinators — Mason Bees, Honey Bees & Others
Sunday, March 9th, 11 am – noon
Learn why pollinators are critical to fruit production, why mason bees are helpful in the Pacific Northwest rain, and how to encourage pollinators in your yard and orchard. This workshop is co-sponsored by City Fruit.

Jan30

Announcing our new Master Fruit Tree Steward Program

Fruit trees remind us of our agricultural past and continue to be an important community resource. To date, City Fruit has harvested more than 50,000 pounds of fruit from residential trees and donated it to those who otherwise couldn’t afford fresh produce. Keeping these urban fruit trees healthy is a priority.

MasterFruitTreeStewardProgram_01In 2014 City Fruit will launch a new Master Fruit Tree Steward Program with support from the King Conservation District Community Partnership Program. City Fruit will train lay fruit tree experts who can, in turn, teach their neighbors—an efficient and effective way to improve the health and productively of urban fruit trees.

In this train-the-trainer program volunteers will participate in workshops, field trips, and mentoring sessions on fruit tree care in exchange for providing hands-on support and mentoring to Seattle residents who live on properties with fruit trees. The 2014 goals include designing the curriculum, producing videos and slide shows, training an initial cohort of volunteer stewards, and creating a business model that is replicable and self-supporting.

Workshops will run from July – Dec 2014. Anyone interested in joining the project to become a Master Fruit Tree Steward should contact [email protected]  by May 15.

Jul31

City Fruit Cocktail Class @ Cuoco

City Fruit Cocktail classPRICE: $40 all inclusive

Purchase Tickets

DATE: 08/15/2013
TIME: at Cuoco
LOCATION: Cuoco’s Sophia Room
VIEW MAP

Cost: $40 for one class

All proceeds of this event will benefit City Fruit

Cuoco is proud to team up with *City Fruit for a 3 month series of cocktail classes.  These cocktail classes will focus on the fruit being harvested around the city and will demonstrate various techniques for utilizing fruit in drinks including bitters, infusions, syrups, purees, pickles and more!  Sampling of all the drinks created as well as snacks will be provided, along with the opportunity to get some hands on participation.

Class attendees can expect to take home recipes, a city fruit membership (which gives them access to special events as well as discounts at various nurseries around town), fruit from City Fruit, as well as treats to make cocktails at home!

Class Schedule:

  • Thursday, September 19th: Italian Plums and Asian Pears
  • Thursday, October 24th: Apples and European Pears

 

All classes begin at 6pm and are located in Cuoco’s Sophia Room.
Class size is limited to 20 seats.
*City Fruit promotes the cultivation of urban fruit in order to nourish people, build community and protect climate.  The organization helps tree ownders grow healthy fruit, provide assistance in harvesting and preserving fruit, promote the sharing of extra fruit and work to protect urban fruit trees.  City Fruit focuses on: Conservation, preservation of the urban tree canopy, stewardship, harvest, using and sharing fruit as well as community building.