Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Apr14

Eat for Equity Seattle

358253-250Looking for a way to spice up Sunday brunch?

On April 27th, why not dine to support immigrant and workers’ rights? Eat for Equity Seattle organizes community feasts for a cause, working towards building aculture of generosity in Seattle. Each month, E4E organizes events to bring community together for the greater good.

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In September, Eat for Equity held a community feast for City Fruit at the Picardo P-Patch, raising almost $400! This April, E4E is supporting the May 1st Action Coalition, which brings together individuals, community representatives and organizations to advance key workers’ struggles and immigration reform.

 

 

358254-250The Coalition organizes Seattle’s annual May Day March and Rally for Immigrant and Workers Rights to celebrate International Worker’s Day and advocate a more just and humane immigration system.

This will be Eat for Equity’s first ever brunch, and it will be hosted at El Centro de la Raza. The menu is cooked from scratch by volunteers, and will feature a biscuits and local jam (made by P-Patchers!) spring salad, a sunchoke and potato puree with breakfast sausages, quiches, a cardamom fruit salad, pour-over coffee and local tea, as well as Poinsettias made to order.

Everyone is welcome at this private party, but you must RSVP to secure your spot. Details can be found when you RSVP.

Interested in volunteering? Email seattle@eatforequity.org

Visit them on the web: www.eatforequity.org/seattle, follow us on Facebook: Eat for Equity Seattle, and on Instagram and Twitter: @eatforequitysea

Apr10

Celebrate Spring; Two great classes this weekend!

The weather outside is perfect for getting back into your garden, and perfect for pollinators to make their rounds in the fruit trees. If you’re looking for something to do this weekend, check out these classes:


pollinators

Attract & Provide Safe Haven for Beneficial Pollinators, with journeyman-level certified beekeeper, Bob Redmond
SATURDAY 10am-Noon @ Bradner Gardens Park, 1730 Bradner Place South

If you’re interested in Native Pollinators, Don’t miss this class! Native pollinators comprise 99.96% of the pollinator species on the planet, and their existence is constantly under threat. Learn about these amazing species, their extreme importance to the future and security of food, and how you can benefit pollinators in your garden.

We’ll cover:
• Why pollination is vital for successful fruit crops
• History of pollinators
• How native bees differ from the standard honey bee
• How to identify native bees
• Attracting native bees—including what to plant
• How to create nesting habitats

City Fruit members – $20; general public – $25


containers

Success with Container-Grown Fruit Trees with Jacqueline Cramer, co-founder of Beacon Food Forest

SUNDAY 11am-Noon @ City People’s Garden Store, 2939 East Madison Street

Growing fruit trees in containers allows you to save space, move the tree around, reduce disease and, in many cases, produce more fruit. Join us to find out how you can successfully grow fruit in a small space!

We’ll cover:
• Appropriate trees for containers
• Soil types
• Understanding rootstocks
• Best Pruning techniques
• Special considerations for container trees

This class is part of the Second Sunday Series of fruit tree classes, a collaboration between City People’s Garden Store and City Fruit.

Call City People’s at 206-324-0737 to register – space is FREE, but an RSVP is required/appreciated. We hope to see you there!

Feb11

Farm Imaginings visits Danny Woo

Danny Woo Garden/Orchard © Camille Dohrn

Danny Woo Garden/Orchard © Camille Dohrn

 

A friend of City Fruit and local photographer Camille recently took a journey to Danny Woo community garden and orchard with her camera, and has some lovely photos to share. Check them out on her site, the Farm Imaginings blog:

http://www.farmimaginings.com/urban-farms/danny-woo-community-garden/

Jan30

Support City People’s to support City Fruit

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City People’s Garden Store in Madison Valley is a locally owned and operated community garden store. Since opening in 1988, we have been committed to offering a wide selection of quality plants and organic and natural products to help you grow them. With over 15,000 square feet, the outdoor nursery is an urban oasis!

City People’s strives to give back to our communities who have so generously supported us over the years. Through donations and marketing avenues we support organizations that help us grow healthy communities in the areas of environment and gardening, education and youth programs, and food security.

This winter the Garden Store is concentrating support toward City Fruit through the sale of bare root fruit shrubs and trees.* 10% of the proceeds from the sale of these items through March will go to City Fruit. We will also host City Fruit workshops this month and throughout the year (details below, and on the calendar).

Bare root berries are coming from Peaceful Valley Farm, an organic farm in California; raspberries, blueberries, strawberries, goji berries, and currants, plus rhubarb, jerusalem artichoke, & asparagus. We are excited about this new organic vendor who use no sprays (including biological sprays), making sure not to harm any critters – especially fragile bees and butterflies.

Bare root trees from Mt Vernon, Washington and Mallala, Oregon include:
Apples – dwarf, columnar, espaliered & 4-way combo varieties
Pears - espaliered & 4-way combos
Cherries - including several dwarf varieties
Hardy Nectarine - dwarf
<& Plums, Figs, Meyer Lemons, Honeyberry, Kiwi, Japanese Pepper, Goumi, Grape and Hops!

City People’s Garden Store’s bare root fruit selection will be arriving the first week of February. Come early for the best selection!

* Buying bare root plants is an affordable way to grow your edible garden as you are buying only the plant and not the soil or the pot.


Don’t forget to check out City People’s Garden Store’s fruit-related talks coming this spring:
Registration is required. To sign up for a workshop, send an email to gardenstore@citypeoples.com or call the store (206) 324-0737.

Winter Fruit Tree Pruning
Sunday, February 9th, 11 am – noon
Winter fruit tree pruning can improve overall health and appearance and can increase fruit production. This class, co-sponsored by City Fruit, discusses pruning tools, basic biology behind pruning fruit trees, basic cuts and how to stimulate fruit production.

Planting Fruit Trees
Sunday, February 16th, 11 am – noon
Getting your fruit tree off to a healthy start means buying a healthy tree and planting it correctly. Root health is critical for tree health, and this class demonstrates the key considerations in planting a new tree. Bare root trees will be available and a portion of purchases of fruit will go to CityFruit. Instructor Jana Dilley is the Program Manager for the City of Seattle’s reLeaf program and is a certified arborist.

Pollinators — Mason Bees, Honey Bees & Others
Sunday, March 9th, 11 am – noon
Learn why pollinators are critical to fruit production, why mason bees are helpful in the Pacific Northwest rain, and how to encourage pollinators in your yard and orchard. This workshop is co-sponsored by City Fruit.

Jan30

Announcing our new Master Fruit Tree Steward Program

Fruit trees remind us of our agricultural past and continue to be an important community resource. To date, City Fruit has harvested more than 50,000 pounds of fruit from residential trees and donated it to those who otherwise couldn’t afford fresh produce. Keeping these urban fruit trees healthy is a priority.

MasterFruitTreeStewardProgram_01In 2014 City Fruit will launch a new Master Fruit Tree Steward Program with support from the King Conservation District Community Partnership Program. City Fruit will train lay fruit tree experts who can, in turn, teach their neighbors—an efficient and effective way to improve the health and productively of urban fruit trees.

In this train-the-trainer program volunteers will participate in workshops, field trips, and mentoring sessions on fruit tree care in exchange for providing hands-on support and mentoring to Seattle residents who live on properties with fruit trees. The 2014 goals include designing the curriculum, producing videos and slide shows, training an initial cohort of volunteer stewards, and creating a business model that is replicable and self-supporting.

Workshops will run from July – Dec 2014. Anyone interested in joining the project to become a Master Fruit Tree Steward should contact info@cityfruit.org  by May 15.

Jan28

MLK Day of Service

Urban-Orchard

Martin Luther King, Jr. proclaimed, “Life’s most persistent and urgent question is: What are you doing for others?”

Realizing the importance of serving others, City Fruit coordinated over fifteen new volunteers at the Amy Lee Tennis Center. What ensued was a beautiful gathering of people who had no idea the Amy Yee Tennis Center is actually much more than a tennis center. It is an urban orchard with over 30 fruit bearing trees that, for better or worse, have not been taken care of over the years.

In just four hours, volunteers cleared out 20 tarp loads of invasive plants that had stymied the growth of fruit throughout the years. Although we can’t yet measure our success in pounds of fruit donated, the work is critical to the productivity of the various fruit trees at Amy Yee. With more work parties planned for the future, it is hopeful these trees will produce more bountiful fruit to provide to Seattle’s food insecure.

-Report from our Volunteer Coordinator, Melanie Peters. Originally posted on the Rotary First Harvest blog.

Jan27

New compact berry bushes from Raintree – great for small urban spaces!

Recent news from one of our favorite local nurseries:

Gorgeous four-season edible ornamentals for small spaces

BrazelBerries Peach Sorbet 3+: $19.95

Fruit gardeners with limited space and an eye for beauty will love the BrazelBerries®. They are new dwarf blueberries and raspberries bred to thrive in containers. True edible ornamentals, they are beautiful in all seasons and produce lots of delicious fruit in small spaces.
They are perfect for folks with limited space who want to grow their own healthy food on a balcony or patio. They will also thrive planted in the ground in your yard.
For many years, Raintree Nursery has specialized in edible plants for the different niches in your yard including many varieties that will grow well in pots.

BrazelBerries« Jelly BeanÖ 3+: $19.95

Look for them throughout the catalog and go towww.raintreenursery.com and learn lots more about varieties and techniques suited to growing wonderful fruit in containers.
Jan10

City Fruit welcomes Melanie Peters!

Greetings City Fruit Supporters,

Melanie at Rise Up FarmsMy name is Melanie Peters, the new AmeriCorps VISTA at City Fruit. I’m part of Rotary First Harvest’s “Harvest Against Hunger” program that has connected farmers, food banks, volunteers, and truckers to make sure no crop gets wasted, especially when food insecurity very much exists in our community. I’m thrilled to be starting this year of service to my country and community in Seattle with new challenges and rewards.

Growing up about twenty minutes outside of Chicago, some of my earliest memories were spent alongside my dad and sisters in our backyard, harvesting rhubarb to make fresh rhubarb pie. I’ve always had a connection to the land and to food, so it wasn’t a surprise when I picked up sustainability as a minor in college and began to work with the local food movement in Northern Indiana. I interned at Rise Up Farms during the terribly dry summer of 2012 where I learned the basics of permaculture, how to operate a CSA, and how grow bountiful vegetables without using caustic sprays or chemicals.

After graduating from Indiana University, I moved to Indianapolis to serve as an AmeriCorps VISTA with Indy Hunger Network. I worked alongside wonderful people and organizations that cared deeply about making fresh food a reality for all, regardless of income. One of Indy Hunger Network’s proudest accomplishments occurred last year after receiving a Specialty Crop Block Grant from the USDA to fund a double-up incentive program at six Indianapolis farmers’ markets. This program provides up to a $20 match to any SNAP (formerly known as food stamps) recipient at any of the participating farmers’ markets.

At Indy Hunger Network, I also developed a gleaning program with Butler University’s Sustainable Foods Fellow that has since been taken on by a new AmeriCorps VISTA. In the two months that we operated what we called “The Glean Team,” we harvested over 15,000 pounds of produce (including 2,000lbs of apples!) with over 35 volunteers that would have otherwise been tilled under the ground. All of the produce was delivered free of charge by volunteers at neighborhood food pantries.

While most of my work in the food movement has been with vegetables, I’m ready and excited to learn and work with urban fruit and nut-bearing trees.  This year at City Fruit, I plan to vamp up the volunteer opportunities that City Fruit has to offer, increase member benefits, and coordinate harvest teams. I so look forward to meeting and working with each of you throughout this year.

Best,

Melanie A. Peters

 

Dec23

Paul Towers: Bees can’t wait 5 more years

The following is excerpted from Paul Tower’s blog in Civil Eats. 

Inaction? Intransigence? Negligence? Whatever the right word, we’re reminded that the U.S. is behind the curve when it comes to protecting bees.  This month Europe’s restrictions on bee-harming pesticides went into effect.  In early December  in a full-page advertisement in the New York Times and six other major papers, Pesticide Action Network (PAN) and over 60 other food, farm, faith, and investor groups called on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to take action to protect bees.

Bees pollinate much of our food, including the cranberries and pumpkin on so many Thanksgiving tables last monthHoney 1  w pollen. In fact, we rely on bees for about a third of our food.

But these noble pollinators are in trouble. Beekeepers in the U.S. have been losing, on average, over 30 percent of their bees each year since 2006—twice what is considered sustainable. And commercial beekeepers, whose bees pollinate California almonds, lost over 50 percent of their colonies last year. Some even reported historic losses of 70 percent or more.

This is unsustainable, not only for beekeepers, but also for our food system and the agricultural economy.

EPA has stated that it’s at least five years away from doing anything to protect bees from pesticides known to be harmful. First, the agency needs to complete its review of neonicotinoids, a relatively new and widely used class of systemic pesticides—which isn’t due to conclude until 2018.

Scientists point to neonicotinoids as a catalyst driving bee declines. While acutely toxic to bees (it kills them), studies have shown neonics also compromise bee immune systems and make them more susceptible to a wide range of other impacts like poor nutrition, mites, and diseases.

Until EPA completes its (very slow) review of neonic products, the agency will not take action to adequately protect bees from this known threat.

Beekeepers say they—and the bees—can’t wait for the agency’s glacial pace. Federal officials have tried to appease beekeeper concerns with aimless conferences and reports, along with changes to pesticide product labels that yield no additional protections for bees. But decisive action, not token action, is urgently needed.

As beekeeper Jim Doan of New York said: “Beekeepers are losing colonies at an unprecedented rate—the losses are too extreme to keep up with, and our entire industry is at risk of collapse unless federal action is taken.  Convening conferences and changing pesticide labels is not nearly enough.”

States in Action

Since EPA has failed to step up in a timely way, states across the country are taking up the issue of protecting bees. In New York and New Jersey, legislative leaders have already introduced bills that would ban or track neonicotinoid pesticides.

And last week, we were offered another glimmer of hope as Oregon regulators announced they are planning to restrict the use of neonicotinoids used on trees—and linked to a recent massive bee kill in that state.

While state action is helpful, bees need more comprehensive and uniform protections across the country. EPA should see states in action as a signal that the agency needs to step up. And quickly.

Take action » See a copy of the advertisement and join the Center for Food Safety, the Ceres Trust, Beyond Pesticides and PAN in sending a message to new EPA chief Gina McCarthy: It’s time to step up for bees.

- See more at: http://civileats.com/2013/12/02/above-the-fold-epa-protect-bees/#sthash.2B6Leq5J.dpuf

Dec12

Territorial Seed Company: dispelling a rumor

This post was excerpted from an article by Debbie Teashon and published in the Dec 2013 newsletter of the Seattle Tree Fruit Society.

Rumor has it that Monsanto Corporation owns the Pacific Northwest-based seedhouse, Territorial Seed.  This rumor is simply not true.  Tom and Julie Johns, who still own the company, purchased Territorial Seeds from Steve Solomon back in 1985.

When Monsanto purchased the wholesale seed company Seminis, Territorial looked for other sources of seed and phased out buying seeds from Seminis.  By 2012 Territorial no longer purchased any seed from the Monsanto subsidiary.

Territorial continues to trial seeds for the Pacific NW’s unique and challenging temperate, Mediterranean climate in an effort to provide quality seed for the Northwest gardener.  This includes no GMO’s.

Nov05

City Fruit Silent Auction Catalog

Cider_Taste_2013_Final(1)

 

We are excited to announce that this year’s Hard Cider Tasting will feature an food-tastic silent auction.

Highlights:

-Signed copy of The Photography of Modernist Cuisine

-FinnRiver Cidery Tasting and Tour

-EcoBeauty Spa Package

-Hard Cider Making Kit from Sound Homebrew

-Dinner for two at Tom Douglas restaurant, Cuoco

-much much more!

Click here to download our silent auction catalog and thanks for supporting the urban harvest!

Oct17

John (Appleseed) Chapman’s Fruitful Eccentricity

This post is excerpted from a longer article by Don Ricks published in the Seattle Tree Fruit Society’s Urban Scion Post:

John Chapman (the original and real Johnny Appleseed) roamed Ohio in the early 1800′s and helped pave the way for the future western migration and colonization of settlers into what was then the frontiers of Ohio and Indiana.

Chapman was deeply religious.  A devout Christian, he was in fact a mystical Swedenborgian Christian, someone who might prefer to preach rather than to plant . . but did a lot of both.  He roamed the woods in stark clothes, slept outside, and was a marginalized character in a marginal frontier society.  He didn’t marry, although marriage was considered a necessary religious state to Swedenborgians.

Chapman believed grafting to be immoral and was concerned that apple trees shouldOldest Apple Tree come purely from seed.  As a result, he contributed much to genetic diversity and to apples that were fit for cider, maybe hard cider, but not apples that could match the sweetness of today’s eating apples.

 

Oldest apple tree in Washington State, Ft Vancouver, WA.
Oct11

Recipe: Apple Crisp

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Photo by Dorothy Finley

 

October is all about apples! Check out this awesome recipe from our very own Betsy Moyer.

Apple Crisp

Ingredients

5 cups peeled & sliced apples (the apples I use are the Gravenstein from our front yard, but any sweet/tart cooking apples will be good.  Don’t use Red Delicious, they get a little mushy and loose their flavor).

2 TBS white sugar

2 TBS light brown sugar

½ cup rolled oats

½ cup packed brown sugar

¼ cup flour

¼ tsp ground nutmeg

¼ tsp ground ginger

¼ tsp ground cinnamon

¼ cup butter at room temperature

¼ cup chopped nuts (walnuts or pecans)

Directions: place apples in a 2 qt baking dish and stir in the 2 TBS of white sugar and the 2 TBS of brown sugar.  For the topping, combine the oats, brown sugar, flour and spices.  Cut in the butter until the mixture is crumbly without any loose ingredients left in the bowl. Fold in nuts. Sprinkle the topping over the apples.  (I love this topping, so I usually double it for the 5 cups of apples). Bake in a 375 degree oven for 30-35 minutes or until the topping is golden and you can stick a fork through the apples. Serve warm with vanilla ice cream!

Oct02

Support Seattle’s Fresh Bucks Program!

fruits-vegetables Fresh Bucks NowSeattle’s Got Green?, a local grassroots organization that works to make sure  low-income people and communities of color have access to the benefits of the green economy, is issuing a call to action for more access to healthy food.  Got Green? was instrumental in launching Seattle’s Fresh Bucks Program in July 2012.  Under this program, EBT (food stamp) users receive $10 in Fresh Bucks per day to buy fruits and vegetables at local farmers markets. Families receive up to $70 extra “bucks” each week.  The initiative is hailed for reducing food insecurity in Seattle as well as  boosting Washington’s farmers and farmers markets.

Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn’s budget contains $100,000 to support the Fresh Bucks program in 2014.  The budget went to the City Council on September 23, and it us now up to all of us to ensure that the City Council approves funding for this important program.

Here’s what you can do:

→Show your support at the Seattle City Council Budget Committee Hearing: Thursday, Oct 3 at 5:30pm City Council Chambers (600 Fourth Avenue)

→Call City Council members Visit Got Green’s Facebook event “Call Seattle City Council to fund Fresh Bucks in 2014 city budget!”  for a sample script, talking points, and contact information for our City Council members.

Spread the word


YouTube DirektSpread the word.

 

 

 

 

 

Aug09

City Fruit-Cycle: Drop off your fruit every Wednesday at Bike Works

City Fruit is kicking off a new initiative in which we encourage homeowners to harvest their own fruit, drop it off with us, and we’ll make sure it gets to one of our many food banks partners.

We are so psyched to be partnering with Bike Works to provide this community resource. Bike Works has been working for kids, bikes, and community since 1996. Their programs invest in young people and encourage bicycling as a clean and healthy transportation alternative. Check them out!

Our lovely fruit trike will be parked out in front of Bike Works in Columbia City on Wednesdays from 3:30-6:30 pm during the Columbia City Farmers Market.  Come on by with your extra fruit and help us get this initiative off the ground.

Wanna volunteer? We need people to help staff our fruit cycle on Wednesdays from 3:30pm-6:30pm. Contact colette@cityfruit.org if interested.

 

Jul31

City Fruit Cocktail Class @ Cuoco

City Fruit Cocktail classPRICE: $40 all inclusive

Purchase Tickets

DATE: 08/15/2013
TIME: at Cuoco
LOCATION: Cuoco’s Sophia Room
VIEW MAP

Cost: $40 for one class

All proceeds of this event will benefit City Fruit

Cuoco is proud to team up with *City Fruit for a 3 month series of cocktail classes.  These cocktail classes will focus on the fruit being harvested around the city and will demonstrate various techniques for utilizing fruit in drinks including bitters, infusions, syrups, purees, pickles and more!  Sampling of all the drinks created as well as snacks will be provided, along with the opportunity to get some hands on participation.

Class attendees can expect to take home recipes, a city fruit membership (which gives them access to special events as well as discounts at various nurseries around town), fruit from City Fruit, as well as treats to make cocktails at home!

Class Schedule:

  • Thursday, September 19th: Italian Plums and Asian Pears
  • Thursday, October 24th: Apples and European Pears

 

All classes begin at 6pm and are located in Cuoco’s Sophia Room.
Class size is limited to 20 seats.
*City Fruit promotes the cultivation of urban fruit in order to nourish people, build community and protect climate.  The organization helps tree ownders grow healthy fruit, provide assistance in harvesting and preserving fruit, promote the sharing of extra fruit and work to protect urban fruit trees.  City Fruit focuses on: Conservation, preservation of the urban tree canopy, stewardship, harvest, using and sharing fruit as well as community building.

 

Jun14

Recipe: Cherry Apricot Almond Tart

Cherries are almost here!! Check out this delicious recipe from Hazel Singer

Buttery, crumbly tart crust

¼ cup toasted almonds
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
1-⅓ cups all-purpose flour
⅔ cup whole-wheat pastry flour
½ cup butter, chilled and cut into small pieces
¾ teaspoon sea salt
1 large egg + 1 yolk, beaten
3 tablespoons cold water

Pulse the almonds and sugar together in a food processor until finely ground. Add flours, butter and salt and process until consistency of wet sand. Add egg and as much water as needed, little by little, until dough comes together into a ball. Divide into two balls, flatten into 4-inch discs, wrap with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes or longer.

Makes 2 crusts

Preheat oven to 400 F.

1 disc of Buttery, Crumbly Tart Crust, chilled
¼ cup blanched almonds
¼ cup + 1 tablespoon sugar, divided
1 large egg
½ cup creme fraiche
2 teaspoons almond extract
1/2 pound cherries, pitted and halved
1/2 pound apricots, halved and pitted

Roll out the pastry dough on a silicone mat or floured surface to a 13-inch circle. Spray a 10- or 11-inch tart pan with cooking spray and carefully lay the dough on top. Tuck it in to fit to the pan and trim the top, leaving a ¼ inch above the pan. Crimp edges along the ridges of the pan.

Spray a sheet of parchment paper with cooking spray and lay, spray side down, on the pastry shell. Fill with dried beans or pie weights and bake for 10 minutes. Remove beans or weights and paper, and let crust cool on a rack.

Pulse together almonds and ¼  cup sugar in a food processor until finely ground. Add egg, creme fraiche and almond extract, and and run the processor until the mixture is smooth. Scoop mixture onto tart shell and spread evenly.

Arrange the halved cherries and apricots on top of the tart, cut side up. Sprinkle with 1 tablespoon sugar and bake 30-40 minutes, until filling is set.

Let cool and serve.

Serves 12


May16

mid-May report

The exceptionally warm and sunny weather has increased fruit set on some trees, hastened the time in which the fruit will come into bearing, and (unfortunately) has increased the bug activity.
Codling moths are flying now. If you are applying foot sox, they should be applied as soon as you see an evident apple upon which to apply the foot sox.
The good news is that Eastern Washington growers are also experiencing an early season and those who love cherries should be seeing some cherries coming from Eastern Washington in early June.

Apr09

Recipe: Whiskey-Apple Crumble Pie

Check out this delicious recipe from City Fruit’s own Hazel Singer…..

Adapted from “Bubby’s Homemade Pies” by Ronald M. Silver and Jen Bervin (John Wiley & Sons, 2007)

 

 

 

 

Photo by Emily Barney on Flickr

 

Time: 2 hours

Dough for a 9-inch single-crust pie

3/4 cup all-purpose flour

3/4 cup, packed, light brown sugar

1/4 cup granulated sugar

1 teaspoon cinnamon

Salt

9 tablespoons cold unsalted butter

1/2 cup chopped pecans

2 pounds tart apples, peeled, cored and sliced 1/4-inch thick

Pinch ground cloves

Pinch ground nutmeg

2 tablespoons whiskey or bourbon.

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Roll out dough and line pie pan. Prick dough with fork, then line with foil. Fill bottom with pastry weights or dry beans. Bake 8 minutes, remove foil and weights and bake 8 to 10 minutes longer, until pastry looks dry and is barely starting to color. Remove from oven and let cool.

2. Place flour, 1/4 cup brown sugar, granulated sugar, 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon and 1/2 teaspoon salt in food processor and process briefly to blend. Dice 6 tablespoons butter and add, along with pecans; pulse until mixture resembles breadcrumbs. Set aside. Increase oven temperature to 450 degrees.

3. Melt remaining butter in a large skillet. Add apple slices and sauté over medium heat about 5 minutes, until a bit softened around edges, with some just starting to brown. Remove from heat. Mix remaining brown sugar and cinnamon with a pinch of salt, the cloves and nutmeg. Pour over apples and fold together. Fold in whiskey.

4. Pour contents of pan into crust and top with crumbs. Place pie pan on a baking sheet, bake 10 minutes, lower heat to 350 degrees and bake about 40 minutes longer, until topping browns and juices bubble. Allow pie to cool completely before cutting. Pie can be made a day in advance and warmed for serving.

Apr02

City Fruit Presents: Deborah Madison