Archive for the ‘Announcements’ Category

Jul26

Guest Bartender Night at 50 North to Benefit City Fruit

GBN Poster CityFruit50 North Restaurant, located in the University Village neighborhood, has invited City Fruit to be their Guest Bartenders on Wednesday , August 21st. This is the restaurant’s way of creating a fun night for customers while raising money for a charity or cause.

50 North is a family-friendly neighborhood place with an excellent bar and great upscale American food. A fun evening is guaranteed! www.50northrestaurant.com

Who? Everyone, friends, family, co-workers and then some…

What? A Fun Benefit for City Fruit

Where? 50 North – 5001 25th Ave NE #100 at Northcut Landing, just North of Chase Bank. Easy, free garage parking!

When? 6 – 9 pm on Wednesday, August 21st. If you want to stay for dinner, you can make a reservation at www.50northrestaurant.com. 50 North generally stops serving dinner at 9 pm and the bar and bar menu shut down at 10. If business demands it, they will extend hours as necessary.

Why? Why wouldn’t you want to have a fun evening with good friends while supporting City Fruit

How? 50 North helps us raise money through:
• 10% of special drink sales for the charity
• Tip Jars around the bar for the charity
• Stickers on the restaurant bills to write in an amount to give the charity and charge it to your credit card
• And they make a donation to the charity

More: Bring anyone you want – friends, family, and co-workers. We look forward to seeing everyone there!

Mar12

Ethan Russo Lecture: New Strategies to Tackle Urban Orchard Pests

Ethan Russo will present the results of his personal experience using an organic spray regimen to prevent apple maggot fly and codling moth on Saturday, March 16, from 10:00 to noon at Seattle University. Don Ricks will join Ethan to discuss his experience with pheremones, traps and GF120.  This event is presented by Seattle University Grounds Department in collaboration with City Fruit.  Ethan Russo, a Vashon Island fruit grower by hobby and pharmacological researcher by profession, had excellent results using an organic spray recommended by Michael Phillips, author of The Holistic Orchard. Don Ricks, a local fruit tree expert, is a lead steward at Piper’s Orchard.

 
The event is free, although a $10 donation is suggested.  Space is limited.  RSVP by contacting info@cityfruit.org and we will send you the room information.

Jul02

Michael Natkin Supports City Fruit!

herbivoracious .  Chef, blogger and author Michael Natkin writes:  “I don’t care if you are a vegetarian, omnivore, carnivore, vegan, pescetarian, or flexitarian! Labels don’t matter. If you want to eat a meatless meal tonight, I want to make sure it is hearty, beautiful, and absolutely delicious.”  I bought his cookbook – I couldn’t resist.  herbivoracious makes you want to rush into the kitchen and get started.  NPR and Amazon voted it one of the 10 best cookbooks in 2012.  Michael is supporting City Fruit by donating $5 to us for every cookbook he sells online.  Buy it here. 

 

Jun20

Homegrown Supports City Fruit with a Watermelon Caprese

Homegrown Sustainable Sandwich Shop is constantly striving to push the envelope on what social responsibility means in business today. They opened with a steadfast commitment to sustainable food sourcing and a rejection of wasteful products like bottled water.

As part of that, they created the Seasonal 10: an initiative that partners Homegrown with a like-minded non-profit each season for a donation of 10% of the sales from their seasonal sandwich. And this summer, they’re partnering with us!

They’ve created a tasty Watermelon Caprese: watermelon, heirloom tomato, fresh basil, feta cream + balsamic reduction. $6 for a small, $10 for a large. Plus you can add prosciutto for an extra $1. My mouth is watering just writing this.

So while you eat at their Fremont, Capital Hill, or Queen Anne locations, you are helping us cultivate urban fruit in order to nourish people, build community and protect the climate. Swing by Homegrown between June 21 and September 21 to support a great local business and local nonprofit.

Big thanks to the folks at Homegrown for their support!

Jan17

Joining City Fruit in 2012 pays off

Starting in 2012, joining City Fruit will not only make you feel great for supporting a worthy cause — it will also save you money. City People’s Garden Store, Swanson’s Nursery, and Molly Moon’s Homemade Ice Cream are offering discounts (and free cones!) to people who join or renew their City Fruit memberships in 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

Join now to get these great deals! An individual membership is just $30 and a household membership is just $50. Your important contribution helps us continue to collect thousands of pounds of fruit each summer that helps feed low-income people in our community.

You can sign up online or send a check to the address listed here.

Oct05

City Fruit October update

We have lots going on in October! If you don’t get our monthly newsletter, here’s what’s happening:

Hard cider!
We’re very excited to invite you to the City Fruit Hard Cider Tasting in Pioneer Square on Thursday, Nov 3 (it’s also Art Walk night). Alpenfire, Finnriver Farm and Cidery, Snowdrift and Tieton Cider Works will bring their Washington-made craft ciders and pearies. You can taste the ciders, meet the producers and buy some cider to take home. The Northwest Sustainability Collaborative and Northwest Cider Association are our partners. Proceeds from the event benefit City Fruit’s 2012 fruit harvest.

Details:
Thursday, Nov 3. 5 – 8 pm. 314 1st Ave So, Seattle (just down the block from the former location of Elliott Bay Books)
Tickets: Brown Paper Tickets or at the door.

Quince class this Saturday
Next up in our Beyond the Canning Jar cooking series is “Demystifying Quince” with culinary celebrity Amy Pennington. Chefs love quince, but the rest of us don’t know what to do with this exquisite fruit. Amy will teach you how to make quince jam and quince paste — yum– on Saturday, Oct 8, 10 am – noon at Dish It Up! in Ballard. Amy’s last book will also be available. Register online or mail a check to City Fruit.

Following on the next three Saturdays are: Shrubs (ancient drinking vinegars) Oct 15; Fruits – from Appetizer to Dessert, Oct 22; and Poaching, Roasting and Braising Fruit, Oct 29. We greatly appreciate the support of our partners, Dish It Up! in Ballard and The Pantry at Delancey — and hope you support them too.

Harvest festivals galore
Our five orchard steward groups are holding get togethers this fall to introduce neighbors to their urban orchards. On Sept 25 the five Ladies with Loppers and Ladders pressed apples into cider under a red tent along the Burke-Gilman Trail, as cyclists and joggers stopped to have a sip and the wind threatened to blow everything away. (Did you know there are apple trees along the Trail?) Then last Sunday the Martha Washington crew gathered more than 60 neighbors at the small park cum orchard on the lake where, again, cider was pressed, cupcakes eaten, and talk revolved around the history of the park and its old apple trees. Coming up: Meadowbrook Harvest Party Oct 7 (6 pm), Beacon Hill Harvest Festival with the Jose Rizal orchard stewards on Oct 22 ( 1 – 9 pm), and the Bradner Gardens Harvest on Oct 30 (2 – 4 pm).

Orchard stewards expanding
Our second grant from the Department of Natural Resources allows us to expand the orchard stewards project to three additional Seattle Parks. Several parks have applied, and we will be meeting on Oct 29, 10:30 – noon, at the Ravenna Eckstein Community Center. Anyone interested in knowing more about the project is welcome.

2011 fruit harvest
The harvest is winding down — wait! apples and grapes are still out there — and we have harvested more than 6000 pounds of fruit in a year we had feared would be worse. A full report on the harvest will come next month, but meanwhile, we will be glad to harvest grapes, apples and quince, so let us know. Contact info@cityfruit.org .

Calendar
Oct 6 Holy Cross orchard Meaningful Movie: Good Food. Contact Farness, Janet jkftahiti@comcast.net
Oct 7 Meadowbrook Harvest Party, 6 pm. Meadowbrook Community Center
Oct 8 Demystifying Quince cooking class with Amy Pennington, 10 am – noon, Dish It Up! in Ballard
Oct 8 Prune Fruit Trees class, Seattle Tilth, 10 am – noon
Oct 15 Shrubs cooking class with Patricia Eddy, 10 am – noon
Oct 22 Fruit – from Appetizer to Dessert cooking class with Roxanne Vierra, 10 am – noon
Oct 22 Beacon Hill Harvest Festival, 1 – 9 pm, Garden House on Beacon Hill
Oct 23 Seattle Tree Fruit Society Fall Show, 10 am – 3 pm, Cedar Valley Grange
Oct 29 Poaching, Braising and Roasting fruit cooking class with Laurie Pfalzer, 10 am – noon
Oct 29 City Fruit orchard steward kick off meeting, 10:30 am – noon, Ravenna Eckstein Community Center
Oct 30 Bradner Gardens Harvest Festival, 2 – 4 pm, Bradner Gardens

Please join City Fruit. We depend on your memberships and support to fund our harvests, and we’re planning for next year now. And remember to friend us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter and read our Blog

Nov02

Looking for New Board Members

The 2010 harvest season has come to a close and we’re starting to put our thoughts towards 2011. As part of that, we’re looking to recruit some new board members to help us grow the organizations. We’re a fun, active, dedicated board who essentially run the organization, so we’re asking board members to commit 5-10 hours a month.

Some specific skills we’re looking for:

  • Fundraising
  • Volunteer management
  • Marketing/PR
  • Web/Technology
  • Finance

And obviously an interest or knowledge of fruit trees or urban agriculture is helpful.

Here are a few accomplishments from this year:

  • 100+ trees harvested
  • 50+ volunteers
  • 11,000 pounds of fruit harvested & donated
  • 820+ fruit trees mapped across the Seattle area
  • Developed a fruit tree stewardship program with Seattle Parks & the city’s Office of Sustainability

And you can see what we did in 2009 in our Annual Report.

You can learn more at our website, Facebook page, or blog to get a sense for what we do.

How to Apply: If you’re interested, please send your resume and a bit about why you’re interested in our organization to James, Board President, at james@cityfruit.org.

Oct25

Fall Fruit Show Coming Up on Halloween

How are you supporting local fruit this Halloween?  Will you be the household that gives away fruit instead of candy to trick-or-treaters?  Will you dress up your baby in this apple costume?

You could also go to the Seattle Tree Fruit Society Fall Fruit Show, which is on Halloween from 10am-3pm.

Here’s five reasons you should go:

1. Lectures all day about a spectrum of fruit topics, from “Unusual Fruits for the Pacific Northwest” to a lecture from “KiwiBob.”  See the schedule of speakers on the STFS calendar.

2. Got Fruit? Bring your apples in to be identified by experts—a great opportunity if you inherited fruit trees on your property or rental.

3. Want Fruit? Everyone has different preferences for fruit flavor and texture, so don’t just rely on what the nursery catalog says.  Sample varieties at the show before you buy a tree, so that you’re sure to like the varieties you choose to plant.

4. See the Center for Urban Horticulture: Stroll around the gardens when you come to the show.  The gardens include some that are purely aesthetic in purpose and others that are intended as demonstration gardens, where you can view plants and design elements you might include in your own garden.

5. City Fruit will be there along with a lot of other fruit-related organizations and businesses.  We’ll have our fact sheets and other educational resources for growing healthy fruit.

See you on Halloween!

Sep24

Nice to Meet You!

You may not have heard that City Fruit has recently hired an AmeriCorps member: that’s me!  I’ll be working on City Fruit projects two days a week out of my office at Phinney Neighborhood Center.  Since I’ve started on September 1, I’ve been busy setting up a full schedule of fall classes.

This will be my second AmeriCorps term; my first was at EOS Alliance (that’s Environmental Outreach and Stewardship Alliance).  Among other things, I set up workshops on sustainable living, organized community events, and hosted habitat restoration work parties.  Before EOS, I was an English major at UPS.  As a student, I studied sustainability in Australia and I interned at Tahoma Audubon Society as the newsletter editor.

Here are some more fun facts:

  • I’m originally from Minnesota, where the Honeycrisp apple was developed.
  • My favorite dessert to make: apple pie.
  • My favorite easy dessert to make: poached plums (recipe follows).
  • If I were a bird, I’d be a loon.
  • If you’d like to contact me about City Fruit, my email address is jill@cityfruit.org (OK, that wasn’t fun so much as useful).

Easy Poached Plums

Pit and halve 2 plums per person, place in an appropriately sized saucepan, and pour in orange juice to just cover.  Sprinkle with cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves, and sugar (optional).  Simmer until soft.

Aug23

Amazing judges for upcoming pie contest

Mark your calendars: the annual Festival of Fruit at Piper’s Orchard is just around the corner. The event takes place Sept. 18 from 10 to 2 and features cider making, talks about the history of the orchard, and fruit identification (bring an apple from your tree to find out the variety!). City Fruit, the Seattle Tree Fruit Society and Friend’s of Piper’s Orchard have put together the event.

We’ll also be hosting an apple pie contest–anyone can enter so feel free to bring a pie–and we have some stellar judges lined up. The judges include (in no particular order):

Jon Rowley: Jon is perhaps best known as the man behind the marketing of Copper River salmon. He organizes the Pacific Coast Oyster Wine Competition, which he calls “an annual dating program for West Coast wines and oysters.”

Jon also works with farmers, restaurants and retailers to improve the quality and distribution of fruits and vegetables. He’s a common sight at weekend farmer’s markets, using his refractometer to measure the sugar in fruits.

He’s a pie maker himself, is a contributing editor at Gourmet magazine and is listed in the “Who’s Who of Cooking in America.”

Lorna Yee: Lorna is a fixture of the local food scene. She’s a contributing editor and the “Key Ingredient” columnist for Seattle Magazine.

Lorna recently published her first cookbook, The Newlywed Kitchen: Delicious Meals for Couples Cooking together, and started her popular blog, The Cookbook Chronicles, to showcase recipe testing for the book.

For a taste of Lorna’s style, check out her sour cherry coffee cake with toasted hazelnut and oatmeal streusel recipe. Yum!!

Tracey Bernal: Tracey has worked as a pastry chef and cook at Campagne, Café Septieme, the Palace Kitchen and the Dahlia Bakery. She is currently a gardener in ornamental landscaping, with a particular interest in edible landscaping. She’s got five types of apples in her yard.

Tracey has been a pie judge at past contests at the Festival of Fruit and is active in the Seattle Tree Fruit Society.

Dr. Bob Norton: Bob is the region’s foremost fruit tree expert. Around 1964, Bob started the Washington State University tree fruit research center in Mt. Vernon with the purpose of bringing about a revival of growing tree fruit in western Washington.

Bob has been a judge at previous pie contests at the Festival of Fruit and brings a unique talent to the judging. That’s because he’s one of the few people who can identify some of the many varieties of apples in our region.

In addition to being a judge, Bob will give a talk at 10 a.m. about hard cider making and will help identify fruit that festival attendees bring in from their own trees.

Tell your friend’s and mark your calendars! It should be a fun day.

Aug12

Get a Free Fruit Tree from the City of Seattle

As part of their Seattle reLeaf program, the City of Seattle is giving away more trees this year — including one variety of fruit tree, the Italian Plum (which is my favorite). The hope is to get 1,000 trees to residents to plant in their yards which will help the city achieve it’s 30% tree canopy goal.

If you live in one of the neighborhoods listed below, you need to get an application in by September 13.  The city is specifically targetting South Seattle neighborhoods this year and the following are eligable to apply:

  • Beacon Hill
  • Columbia City
  • Georgetown
  • Highland Park
  • North Beacon Hill/Jefferson Park
  • Rainier Beach
  • Roxhill/Westwood
  • South Beacon Hill/New Holly
  • South Park
  • Steward Park

There is no need to apply as a group, so individual houses can apply. Trees may be planted along the street or in your yard — keep in mind the fruit tree can’t be planted along the street and needs to go in your yard. There is a limit of 4 per household. The program participants will recieve:

  • Free trees, of course – Available species
  • Watering bags
  • Training on proper tree planting & care
  • One free bag of GroCo compost, made with King County biosolids
  • Helpful tree care tips & reminders

If you don’t happen to live in one of the neighborhoods listed above, you can still get free trees from the city — but time is running out. The Department of Neighborhoods Tree Fund provides free street trees to groups of 5 or more neighbors working together anywhere in Seattle. Groups can request 10 to 40 trees. But the applications are due Monday, August 16 — so get your application in now!

Jul15

Get a Free Fruit Tree

I’ve seen a few different things going around the web recently about how you can get your hands on a free fruit tree so I thought I’d help share them here with some additional info about caring for trees. Keep in mind that there are strings attached to getting one of these free fruit trees — but in both cases below, it’s that the trees are used for the good of the community. Can hardly argue with that.

The Fruit Tree Planting Foundation

One of my favorite organizations out there is The Fruit Tree Planting Foundation. I’ve written about them previously but as a reminder they are, in their own words:

“… a nonprofit charity dedicated to planting edible, fruitful trees and plants to benefit the environment and all its inhabitants. Our primary mission is to plant and help others plant a collective total of 18 billion fruit trees across the world (approximately 3 for every person alive) and encourage their growth under organic standards.”

In order to help them achieve their 3 fruit trees per person, they’re giving away a ton of fruit trees. They have a couple different ways in which you can get them:

  • Fill out this application (Word Doc) for creating an orchard in your community.
  • Submit a project idea to their Communities Take Root contest(in partnership with Dreyer’s Fruit Bars). Then the community gets to vote on which projects receive free fruit trees.

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods

Sorry non-Seattle folks, this one is strictly for the Seattle residents — but it’s worth checking to see if your city offers a similar program.

The Tree Fund provides trees to neighborhoods to “enhance Seattle’s urban forest”. If you & your neighbors get together you can receive 10-40 trees for your community, as well as one fruit tree for yourself (one per household). Your project must be able to demonstrate the capacity to build a stronger, healthier community.

It’s a great way to get to know your neighbors better and improve your community at the same time. Plus think of all the great fruit you’ll get! Check out all the places that received free trees last year. Seattle is serious about improving our city’s urban tree canopy.

When, Where, and How to Plant?

Seattle’s Tree Fund doesn’t do the planting of trees until the fall, which is the perfect time to plant new trees — the temperature is cooler, they’ll get plenty of water. I’m not sure when you’d get the trees from the Fruit Tree Planting Foundation, but I’d recommend waiting until the summer has passed.

It’s not always easy to know where a fruit tree will do well in a yard — that’s why we’ve put some very useful info up on our website. And don’t forget caring for the fruit tree. It’s not hard, but it does require some know-how and effort. But City Fruit is here to help.

And because I’m a visual learner, I really get the most out of watching someone do something rather than reading about it. For those of you like that out there, here’s a handy video on how to plant a fruit tree.


Now go get yourself & your community some fruit trees and start helping build your city’s urban orchard with a great local food source.

Jun29

Get Your Fruit Harvested

It’s getting to be that time of year when the fruit is starting to ripen. We’ve already got our first harvest scheduled for next week to pick a bunch of cherries. Can’t wait!

If you have a fruit tree or grape vine that will produce more fruit than you can possibly eat this summer, there are several organizations out there that will harvest that fruit and ensure that it’s put to productive use – including City Fruit. Check out the below information for the right organization to contact for your neighborhood.

Phinney/Greenwood: phinney@cityfruit.org 

Crownhill: crownhill@cityfruit.org

South Seattle: gail@cityfruit.org

West Seattle: info@gleanit.org

Throughout Seattle: help@gardenhotline.org

Jun23

Fruit Q&A with Don & John

Don’t know which variety will work best in your yard? Unsure what that thing is eating the leaves on your pear tree? Or maybe you are wondering what a grafted tree is?

I’ve got just the guys to answer those questions. And any other ones you can think of.  Meet Don & John.

Don Ricks has been leading the charge on applying foot socks to apples & pears throughout the city. While Don shies away from the term “expert”, he’s very knowledgeable about fruit trees and pest prevention. He’s very involved with the Friends of Piper’s Orchard and sits on the City Fruit Advisory Committee.

John Reardon is a long-time member of the Seattle Tree Fruit Society and has spent many years helping educate and inform people on the proper methods for caring for fruit trees. He also sits on the City Fruit Advisory Committee.

These two guys know a lot about fruit, fruit trees, pest prevention, etc. And they’ve graciously agreed to (try to) answer any question you have.

So if you’ve got a couple burning questions, please send them to fruitqa@cityfruit.org. We’ll pick a couple and share the answers here each month or so.

Jun08

New Project: Seattle Fruit Tree Stewardship

A New Grant

City Fruit has just been awarded a grant from the Department of Natural Resources to develop a community stewardship program to care for fruit trees on community-owned properties, such as parks, community gardens, schools, and other community areas.

Fruit Trees on Public Land

There are a ton of fruit trees on public property – more than 30 Seattle parks have fruit trees. Parks like Carkeek, Othello, and Martha Washington have extensive orchards with some good specimens. And there are other parks that have planted several fruit trees (mini-orchards) as part of other edible landscaping projects – such as the Linden Orchard P-Patch and Bradner Gardens.

While these trees are of value to the community, their maintenance and care are often times more labor-intensive than non-edible trees. And typically the civic landscaping budgets cannot cover the costs of the pruning, managing pests, harvesting fruit, etc. So we’ve been talking with the Seattle Parks Department to figure out how to better care and nurture these trees, harvest and use the fruit, and not negatively impact the bottom line. This project is our attempt to create a model by which we can make that a reality.

About the Project

The project has three main objectives:

  • Create and pilot test a curriculum and training program on fruit tree care for lay gardeners
  • Develop a sustainable, volunteer-based model for the care of fruit trees on public properties
  • Recruit and train 12 – 15 volunteers interested in fruit tree management, using them to evaluate the training curriculum and the stewardship model

We’re really using Seattle’s successful Forest Steward program (a project of the Green Seattle Partnership) as a blueprint – that project builds on volunteers’ desires to work with others to improve the urban landscape. Fruit tree stewards will be responsible for winter and summer pruning, thinning of fruit, recruiting community volunteers to harvest fruit, picking up dropped fruit, summer watering, and basic pest management. The goal is to place at least two stewards per park, with each making a two-year commitment to their orchard. (In the future, stewards can be rotated so that experienced orchard stewards are paired with new ones.)

By the end of this project, volunteers will ‘adopt’ the fruit trees in 4 – 5 public parks. Through collaboration between public agencies, private nonprofit organizations, and the volunteers themselves, the project will create a mechanism through which a fruit tree stewardship program can be sustained over the long-term. Such a model could easily be adapted by other communities interested in preserving this resource but lacking public monies to do so.

To Participate & More Info

If you’re interested in becoming one of the fruit tree stweards or have questions about our new project, e-mail info@cityfruit.org.

 

Jun02

Changes at City Fruit

Courtesy of Mission: SustainableCity Fruit has grown tremendously since we started working in late 2008. We conducted a fruit harvest in Phinney and donated 5,000 pounds of fruit, experimented with selling fruit as a way to raise money, implemented a membership program, held many classes on subjects ranging from canning to espalier, launched a Web site, and many other activities.

So far, the work behind those accomplishments has been done by volunteers. As we at City Fruit plan to take on even more work in the coming year, we are beginning to grow beyond a volunteer-only organization. To that end, we’re very happy to announce that Gail Savina, who hatched the idea behind City Fruit, will be transitioning in to an Executive Director role. This means, of course, that she’s stepping down from the board of directors, but it means that we can ideally begin to pay her for all the work she does, and will continue to do, for City Fruit.

Gail plans to be as involved as ever! We believe that having a paid director will only help City Fruit continue its mission of helping tree owners grow healthy fruit, harvest and use what they can, and share what they don’t need long into the future.

May26

Look good & support City Fruit at the same time

I’m happy to announce that we’ve officially launched an online store where you can buy all kinds of t-shirts, sweatshirts, mugs, & stickers to show your support for City Fruit. 

All proceeds go towards helping fund our work to help residential tree owners grow healthy fruit, to harvest and use what they can, and to share what they don’t need.

 Thanks much to Cafe Press for providing the platform by which we can do such a thing. It’s a great website & store.

Be the first on your block to strut around in a City Fruit t-shirt!

May11

Help Apply Footies in Seattle Orchards

Courtsey of Seattle Tree Fruit SocietyAs you know, we at City Fruit are passionate about pest management. We’ve blogged about it, sell City Fruit Shields to fruit tree owners, and are working to apply the footies on healthy trees in the city.

To help us with this, we’re working with Don Ricks to determine the status of apple maggot and coddling moth in the city, when to start applying pest prevention measures, and which to use.

We’re looking for volunteers to help him apply footies to fruit trees in two different orchard in the city:

If you’re interested, you can find more details on the Piper Orchard website or e-mail Don directly.

Courtesy of Friends of Piper's OrchardDon is continually monitoring the situation in Seattle and has sent us this dispatch:

As of today (5/10/10) I am still not seeing codling moth in the trapsbut what I did see over the weekend is that some of the apples at the Good Shepherd Center are now big enough to apply footies to. Everywhere else, the apples are still too small or we haven’t even had complete petal fall yet.

One month ago it looked like we would have an exceptionally early season this year,  but we have had some cooler than usual weather the past few weeks and this has changed the picture. Neither the bugs nor the fruit is developing as fast as we once thought, but we expect the weather ahead to be warming up shortly. Warmer climes, like the Rainier Valley, will need earlier attention. Cooler climes by the Puget Sound, or at higher elevations, might be a little later.

Consequently, the indications are now that the best time to apply foot sox will be the week before and after Memorial Day.

If you are spraying the organics Neem Oil, kaolin clay, or Spinosad products as your first cover spray for the codling moth, then probably mid- to late-May would be a good time to make the first application. This will have to be followed by sprays every 10 days or so until either harvest time or until you have covered them with foot sox. 

The apple maggot fly will probably be flying in early- to mid-June, but stay tuned for further updates on when the fly is flying and (later in the season) when the fruit will be ripening.     

May07

100 posts!

Kind of a random thing, but I just realized we reached 100 posts on our blog. A small milestone.

Thanks for reading. Here’s to the next 100!

May03

Become part of the Urban Orchard

Join City Fruit.

While we’ve been building up a membership of supporters for the past few months, we’re officially rolling out our membership plan.

In 2010, we will develop a year-long series of fruit tree classes, harvest and distribute 10,000 pounds of fruit, and better coordinate information about fruit tree care and harvesting. Your financial support will help us do this work.

Membership benefits include:

  • One free City Fruit class of your choice.
  • $5 off additional City Fruit classes
  • Coordination of fruit donations to local organizations and families
  • Semi-annual members-only events with speakers, information, Q&A and fruit/jam tasting
  • Monthly newsletter with tree care reminders, news, member stories, and recipes
  • “Urban Orchard” yard sign

Learn more about it here.